Reports have been going on in Uganda’s media that South Sudan rebels are recruiting from Northern Uganda.

International news source Reuters has come up with an article that support war spill over across boarders:

Men wearing South Sudanese military uniforms have launched two raids on a hamlet over the border in Uganda in recent weeks, residents said, stealing cattle and raising fears that a near four-year-old conflict is spreading.

The gunmen also tried to seize refugees from Gbari in the first reported attacks on Ugandan soil since the start of South Sudan’s civil war, locals told Reuters.

“I am afraid, they may come … and burn all the houses,” said Martin Koma, 44, from the village.

South Sudan’s army denied any involvement. But the reports will alarm regional and world powers, struggling to contain ethnically-charged killings and atrocities that the U.N. has warned could lead to genocide.

South Sudanese gunmen have already killed and kidnapped hundreds in cross-border raids in Ethiopia.

Koma said about 26 gunmen attacked Gbari on the morning of June 17, identifying themselves as South Sudanese military and taking 108 cattle.

Three days later, a second group attacked and arrested two South Sudanese refugees living in the village.

“One ran away, the second one because … he looks like Dinka, they left him,” Koma said. The military is dominated by the Dinka, the president’s ethnic group.

Koma said the gunmen were very hostile to the first man, from South Sudan’s minority Kuku tribe, before he got away.

Ugandan military spokesman Brigadier Richard Karemire confirmed the raids on Gbari, without commenting on who carried them out.

South Sudan’s military denied involvement, saying is had received no complaint from Uganda and that the gunmen could have been anyone wearing South Sudanese uniforms.

“This is untrue,” military spokesman Colonel Santo Domic Chol told Reuters. “This is completely negative propaganda by somebody … trying to tarnish the image of the (military).”

By Elias Biryabarema Reuters

International, News

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